Upper Limb

There are 3 bones which make up the elbow joint. These include the humerus, the head of the radius and the olecranon (tip) of the ulna. A common fracture in the elbow region is an olecranon fracture, which is the tip of the ulna. This can occur as a result of direct impact or when falling on an outstretched arm, where the triceps tendon pulls the olecranon away from the ulna.

Conservative management may include:

To determine the most appropriate treatment for you, we recommend booking an initial consultation to discuss your concerns in more detail.

A humeral fracture is an injury to the upper part of the arm, between the elbow and shoulder. Humeral fractures are generally divided into three categories:

  • Proximal humeral fracture which occurs near the shoulder joint and may affect the rotator cuff tendons of the shoulder joint
  • Mid-shaft humeral fracture which occurs part way between the shoulder and elbow joints
  • Distal humerus fracture which occurs near the elbow joint and is most common in children

Conservative management may include:

To determine the most appropriate treatment for you, we recommend booking an initial consultation to discuss your concerns in more detail.

The scaphoid is one of the small bones in the wrist. It is positioned on the thumb side of the wrist. A scaphoid fracture is usually caused by falling on an outstretched hand, with the weight going through the palm. This is a common sporting injury. Sometimes scaphoid fractures don’t show up on plain x-rays and a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is required.

Conservative management may include:

To determine the most appropriate treatment for you, we recommend booking an initial consultation to discuss your concerns in more detail.

Distal radius fractures are very common. They are sometimes called a ‘Colles’ fracture, as it was first described by an Irish surgeon called Abraham Colles.
The radius is the bone of the forearm which is positioned down the outside of the arm, near the thumb. The fracture occurs at the end of the bone near the wrist joint. This commonly occurs when falling on an outstretched arm.

Conservative management may include:

To determine the most appropriate treatment for you, we recommend booking an initial consultation to discuss your concerns in more detail.

The radius and ulna bones make up the forearm, which is situated between the elbow and the wrist. Fractures along the middle of these bones can occur as a result of direct impact, falling on an outstretched arm or in a motor bike accident.

Conservative management may include:

To determine the most appropriate treatment for you, we recommend booking an initial consultation to discuss your concerns in more detail.

Lower Limb

Midshaft fractures are commonly caused by twisting the leg when the foot is fixed to the ground or from direct impact. These generally show up on a plain x-ray.

Conservative management may include:

To determine the most appropriate treatment for you, we recommend booking an initial consultation to discuss your concerns in more detail.

Calcaneal fractures are fractures in the heel bone. They often occur during high energy collisions, such as jumping off a wall or motor vehicle accidents.

Calcaneal fractures often damage the subtalar joint. This causes stiffness in the joint and may make walking on uneven ground difficult.
Conservative management may include:

To determine the most appropriate treatment for you, we recommend booking an initial consultation to discuss your concerns in more detail.

The midfoot joint complex is sometimes called the Lisfranc joint and contains the small lisfranc ligament. This is named after the French surgeon Jacques Lisfranc de St Martin.

Lisfranc (midfoot) injuries occur when the bones of the midfoot are separated from the bones of the forefoot (metatarsals), particularly around the 1st and 2nd metatarsals. This injury can range from simple to complex, depending on how many joints of the foot are involved.

Lisfranc fractures can be misdiagnosed as a simple sprain. If a Lisfranc injury is not treated appropriately, damage can occur to the cartilage. This increases stress on the joints of the midfoot resulting in severe flat foot and midfoot arthritis.

Conservative management may include:

To determine the most appropriate treatment for you, we recommend booking an initial consultation to discuss your concerns in more detail.

A stress fracture is a small crack in the bone which often occurs when you increase the frequency, duration and intensity of exercise. Most stress fractures occur in the weight bearing bones of the foot and lower leg. Common places for stress fractures are the second and third metatarsals, the calcaneus (heel), the fibula (outside of the ankle) and the navicular. Treatment will vary depending on the exact fracture site and the severity.

Conservative management may include:

To determine the most appropriate treatment for you, we recommend booking an initial consultation to discuss your concerns in more detail.

The toes are made up of long bones called phalanges. In the great toe there are two phalanges and one joint, in toes 2 to 4 there are three phalanges and two joints. When people talk about a fractured toe, they are referring to a fracture in one of the phalanges.

Fractures toes usually result from trauma or injury, such as stubbing of the toe or dropping a heavy object onto then toe. A fractured toe is characterised by pain, swelling, stiffness, bruising or deformity of the toe. This may make walking difficult.

Conservative management may include:

To determine the most appropriate treatment for you, we recommend booking an initial consultation to discuss your concerns in more detail.

There are many different types of ankle fractures. These include:

  • Fibula fractures on the lateral (outside) side of the ankle. These are categorised into a Weber A, B or C depending on the level of the fracture
  • Tibia fracture on the inside of the ankle
  • Bimalleolar fracture, which includes both the tibia and the fibula
  • Trimalleolar fractures, which includes the tibia, fibula and the posterior part of the talus

Conservative management may include:

To determine the most appropriate treatment for you, we recommend booking an initial consultation to discuss your concerns in more detail.

The 5th metatarsal is the long bone which runs down the outside of the foot.
A 5th metatarsal fracture often occurs after twisting or rolling the foot and ankle, or when dropping a heavy object on your foot.

Conservative management may include:

To determine the most appropriate treatment for you, we recommend booking an initial consultation to discuss your concerns in more detail.